PETERS FINCHES
17 Parks Street, Urangan Qld 4655
Phone: (07) 4128 9656
 

New Pictures Have Been Added "HERE"

 
 
Sign my Guestbook from Bravenet.com Get your Free Guestbook from Bravenet.com
  • All Finches show are for sale, other varieties can be obtained from time to time, please email (below) for further information!

PLEASE NOTE: All Pictures are Thumbnails

 

eXTReMe Tracker

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • Gouldian white breast finch Gouldian Finch - Chloebia gouldiae Common Names Lady Gouldian, Rainbow finch, name sometimes shortened to Gould.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • Description Male: The breast and belly colours are usually used to determine sex. Males will have a brighter and darker colour of purple on the chest and the yellow of the belly will be darker and more intense than the female. The green back colour and the light blue around the face mask is also darker. Often the face mask in males are larger and clearer than the females, but is not always the case as their are some strains of birds that have equal colour in both sex's face mask. The males will also sing a nearly inaudible song while stretching and hopping on the perch. They will usually begin this song long before they have completed their molt into adult colours. Female: The female has more subdued colours on her chest, belly and back. The female's beak will turn from a pearly white to black when she is in breeding condition.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • Diet The Gouldian has a real preference for the large white millets and will scatter most of the small seeds in a standard finch mix, so I offer them a parakeet mix. They can be somewhat timid about trying new foods but can generally be enticed to take egg food (Roy's egg food), greens and soaked Japanese millet, though I rarely feed the latter two. Grit and calcium in the form of crushed egg and oyster shells and cuttlebone should always be available to them. Many will only occasionally nibble on the cuttlebone, but I still offer it to them. Crushed oyster and egg shells are by far their favourites for calcium intake which really seems higher than most other species. Gouldians also seem to have a greater dietary need for iodine. Insufficient iodine in their diet often results in a loss of feathers around their head. Once the iodine is increased, the feathers will most likely regrow. Most vitamin and mineral supplements include iodine in their mix, but if you find that this is insufficient for their needs you can supplement the iodine through their water. Kelp iodine sources can be purchased at health food stores or there are other sources for iodine such as the disinfectant Vanodine V-18. Remember this is dietary iodine and not the kind used for would care. Potassium Iodine is the source you should be looking for.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • BELOW: Black Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • Breeder's Notes Previous reports on Gouldians [Finches] makes them appear to be temperamental and difficult breeders that require near hot house environments. The current state of the Gouldian is such that it can nearly be considered a domesticated species and by some definitions, is a fully domesticated species. I believe that some of their previous delicate nature was due to their breeder's treatment of them. They looked delicate, were raised delicately and died if treated differently. My Gouldians are in an unheated bird room that routinely drops to below 40 degrees F in the winter and up to 100 degrees in the hottest days of the summer. Since they have not changed their breeding cycle from the wild, they will breed from October through March or April, with the majority of the breeding activity in December through January - the coldest months of the year. They are ready breeders that will raise young in small cages and planted aviaries alike. I use the same individual breeding cages that I use for my Zebra finches (Small breeder) (How to build an all wire cage) with a standard finch box placed inside. The Gouldians like the box that I use with an entrance at the top (nestbox). This allows them to get down low in the box and hide. They are not master nest builders by any means and will use mostly rough materials with softer materials being ignored or even ejected if it is placed in the box. The male will take on the majority of the nest building chores by bringing material to the nest. The female will rearrange the material to her liking.

  • BELOW: Black Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • Red Headed White Breast Yellow Back, Finches

  • Gouldians will lay surprising large clutches of eggs. They average 5-8 eggs, but larger clutches are not that unusual. Incubation will normally begin pretty early with some starting after the first egg or two. The pair will share incubation duties during the day, but quite often the male will stay outside during the night. This actually isn't that surprising since Gouldians are not a 'clumping' species. That is to say the pair will sit side-by-side or clump together with each other or others of their species. After 13-14 days of incubation the young begin to hatch. They are small, pink and lack any fuzz. They are easily identified by the light-reflecting nodes at the corners of their mouth (see mouth markings). The pair will take turn brooding the young with the male remaining outside during the night. After about 10 to 14 days, depending upon the size of the clutch, the female will also begin sleeping outside the box at night. This may seem early since the chicks have barely started to get pin feathers, but they seem to be just fine even if the night time temperatures move down to the low 30's. I think it is important to have lights on for an active period of about 14 to 15 hours. If raised outdoors, the long winter nights may be too long for the chicks to go without food. Especially if it is cold.

  • BELOW: Red Headed White Breast Yellow Back, Finches

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • The chicks will fledge at approximately 22-25 days. At this point they will be a dusky green with a buff belly (see juveniles). Once the chicks fledge, many will not return to the nest at night, but will stay out with the parents. This is variable. It seems that if the parents return to roost in the nest, then the chicks will return with them. The parents will continue to feed the chicks for an additional 2-3 weeks. During this time, the female will usually begin to lay another clutch of eggs. It has always been my practice to remove any clutches of eggs that are laid before the previous clutch has been weaned. This is to give the parents a little break to build up some body reserves before they begin feeding another clutch of young and quite often incubation is sporadic, the young soil the eggs and the hatch rate is far lower than usual. This clutch of removed eggs can easily be fostered to Society finches for them to raise. After the young are weaned and removed from the parents, the pair will usually lay another full clutch of eggs and incubate and raise that that clutch normally.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • BELOW: Red Head White Breast, Red Line Species Finches.

  • The young, sometimes referred to as 'greens', can take up to 9 months to fully molt into adult plumage. Usually though, they are complete within 4-6 months depending upon temperature. Some breeders report higher than usual losses from their Gouldians as they molt into adult colours and that this is due to their 'higher' protein requirement. I have not found this to be the case and suffer no greater losses from young Gouldians than my Zebra finches. They do have a higher protein requirement than a Zebra, but this is not that unusual. It is the Zebra and Society finch that has an unusually low protein requirement. Given the proper diet which includes proteins and fats as well as the carbohydrates from their seeds, young Gouldians are hardy birds.